REVIEW: ★★ Acts of Disunion, White Bear Theatre

REVIEW: ★★ Acts of Disunion, White Bear Theatre

Acts of Disunion presents two different plays and visions about ‘Brexit Britain.’

In Button, the population is forced to live in bunkers after a catastrophic event. There is a button and they should not press it. What does it do? Nobody knows for sure but various researches hint that it could endanger the population. Julia (Zari Lewis) is against pressing the button. Stanley (Howard Lewis Morgan) wants to know what it does. Finally Julia gives in. What will happen to both of them?

Although Button is based around a very simple idea, the dialogues are well written and help both actors to keep the audience engaged and entertained throughout.

In Kingdom, Mark (Paul Boichat) comes to visit his parents and discuss the possibility of selling their flat with his father Alton (Richard Harfst). Meanwhile workmen find an unexploded bomb from WW2 nearby. Alton doesn’t want to move under any circumstances, not to sell, not to save his life from a potential explosion. He is stuck in his chair and in the past. He reminisces about what once was and complains about the foreigners who have since settled in the local community and don’t speak English well enough. Meanwhile the police comes several times, knocking at the door to ask them to evacuate the building. Although the narrative definitely gives a sense of a generation stuck in the past, it also drags on for too long as the audience witnesses what seems like a never ending loop.

As the population of Britain signs an online petition calling for the revocation of the UK’s Article 50 notification, Acts of Disunion is incredibly topical. What will happen to Britain in the coming days, weeks or months? Nobody knows, but Howard Lewis Morgan offers to explore the different sides of an ongoing debate. Acts of Disunion is an entertaining piece of theatre, for the most part, and is worth a watch.

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